Last edited by Mikalar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

7 edition of Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought found in the catalog.

Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought

by Belinda Roberts Peters

  • 215 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • British & Irish history: c 1500 to c 1700,
  • Political science & theory,
  • c 1600 to c 1700,
  • History - General History,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Love / Sex / Marriage,
  • Political aspects,
  • History: World,
  • England,
  • Family & Relationships,
  • Social History,
  • Sociology - Marriage & Family,
  • History / Great Britain,
  • 17th century,
  • Despotism,
  • History,
  • Marriage

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8399358M
    ISBN 101403920362
    ISBN 109781403920362

    Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.   Those familiar with the political essays of the seventeenth century know that many tracts were long—some attaining book length. Thus these two volumes include fewer tracts than could otherwise have been the case, and many excellent works could not be considered.

    The seventeenth century represents a fascinating period of English history, drawing the attention of whole generations of historians. This turbulent age saw three major events that had a deep impact on England’ s political as well as social life—the English Revolution, the. Seventeenth century records of church and quarter sessions courts shed vivid and fascinating light upon family life, relationships between couples married and unmarried, contemporary attitudes to morality and immorality, and key social issues such as bastardy, prostitution, pre-marital relations, separation and sexual freedom.

    This book offers a new account of women’s engagement in the poetic and political cultures of seventeenth-century England and Scotland, based on poetry that was produced and circulated in manuscript. Katherine Philips is often regarded as the first in a cluster of women writers, including Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn, who were political, secular, literary, print-published, . Patriarchalism in Political Thought: The Authoritarian Family and Political Speculation and Attitudes Especially in Seventeenth-Century England Article Jun


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Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought by Belinda Roberts Peters Download PDF EPUB FB2

Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought th Edition by Belinda Roberts Peters (Author)Cited by: 1. This study traces the decline of marriage as a metaphor for political authority, subjection, and tyranny in seventeenth-century political thought.

An image that bound consent and contract with divine right absolutism, and irrevocably connected royal prerogatives with subjects' liberties, its Pages: This study traces the decline of marriage as a metaphor for political authority, subjection, and tyranny in Seventeenth-century political thought.

An image that bound consent and contract with divine right absolutism, and irrevocably connected royal prerogatives with. “His Wife, said he, his Wife. O fatall sound!” This study traces the decline of marriage as a metaphor for political authority, subjection, and tyranny in Seventeenth-century political thought.

An image that bound consent and contract with divine right absolutism, and irrevocably connected royal prerogatives. was provoked or inspired by the political debates of both the Civil War and the Restoration.

The royalists thought they had found in the marriage contract a per-fect analogue to any supposed contract between the king and his subjects, for mar-riage was a contract but was in its essence both hierarchical and irrevocable. Parlia. The marriage contract was an important image in political debates between royalists and parliamentarians in seventeenth-century England.

Attention is paid to the areas in which the seventeenth-century reality was differentfrom today’s. In seventeenth-century England, marriage and sexual morals played a far moreimportant social role than nowadays. A family centred around a married couple representedthe basic social, economic and political unit.

Marriage in Seventeenth-Century England: The Woman’s Story 23 You will think, perhaps, I need not advise you to love your Wife. The Lord teach you how to do it;—or else it will be done ill-favouredly.

Though Marriage be no instituted Sacrament, yet where the undefiled bed is, and love, this union aptly resembles that of Christ and His Church. Marriage was a very common institution in the Stuart period, with 80% of the population married.

After a spouse’s death, remarriage was common, sometimes several times, because marriage was seen as a way of establishing yourself in society.5/5(1). Book Reviews seventeenth-century English political and religious thought more generally.

Susanne Woods Wheaton College Peter Lake with Michael Questier, The Anti-Christ's Lewd Hat: Protestants, Papists, and Players in Post-Reformation England. Marriage in seventeenth-century English political thought.

[Belinda Roberts Peters] -- "Marriage was, in the first half of the seventeenth century, an important metaphor for the special political and religious standing of England, defining the contract between king and kingdom and.

Jonathan Scott's major reinterpretation of the seventeenth century, the most turbulent period in English political history, is timely. It coincides with the ongoing debate over Britain's place in Europe, the current experiment in devolution and the recent discussion of the monarchy's relevance.

Patriarchalism in political thought: the authoritarian family and political speculation and attitudes especially in seventeenth-century England: Author: Gordon J. Schochet: Publisher: Basic Books, Original from: the University of California: Digitized: Nov. thor of numerous books on seventeenth-century English history, including Puritanism and Revolution (), ln- tellectual Origins of the English Revolution (), God’s Englishman: Oliver Cromwell (), Milton and the En- glish Revolution (), and most recently A Nation of Change and Novelty: Radical Politics, Religion and Litera.

Buy Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought by Belinda Roberts Peters from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Book Edition: Ed.

9 This view is put forward in some of the best of recent revisionist writings: Burgess, Glenn, “ Common Law and Political Theory in Early Stuart England,” Political Science 40 (): 4–17, esp.

13 – 14, and The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, – (), esp. –56; Christianson, Paul, “ Royal. LITERATURE AND THE POLITICS OF FAMILY IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND and offers a new perspective on how seventeenth-century literature reflected as well as influenced political thought.

su fang ngis Assistant Professor of English at. SHORTER NOTICES Marriage in Seventeenth-Century Political Thought, by Belinda Roberts Peters (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, ; pp.

£45). The aims of this book are thoroughly praiseworthy. For too long political Author: Knights, Mark. Rape and Resistance: Women and Consent in Seventeenth-Century English Legal and Political Thought. During the Exclusion crisis, the figure of a tyrant rapist, a ruler undone by his own lust and cruelty, briefly appeared on the London by: Rape and Resistance: Women and Consent in Seventeenth-Century English Legal and Political Thought Article in Journal of British Studies 39(2) April.

MARRIAGE AMONG THE ENGLISH NOBILITY IN THE 16TH AND 17TH CENTURIES In this paper an attempt is made to study the marriage customs and family relationships of the titular peerage and the or so leading county families who together formed the dominant political and social grouping of Tudor and Stuart England.Gorden Schochet, Patriarchalism in Political Thought: The Authoritarian Family and Political Speculation and Attitudes Especially in Seventeenth-Century England (New York: Basic Books, ), Schochet suggests that the general alignment of the family with the state became explicitly theorized at the beginning of the Stuart period once contract theorists articulated a Cited by: 1.Richard Hooker (25 March, – 3 November ) was an English priest in the Church of England and an influential theologian.

He was one of the most important English theologians of the sixteenth century. His defence of the role of redeemed reason informed the theology of the seventeenth century Caroline Divines and later provided many members of the Church of Born: 25 March,Heavitree, Exeter, Devon.